Commercial Education Trust : Policy Makers

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Policy Makers

Policy Makers

There are real benefits to students engaging in commercial education activities which develop their personal skills; provide guidance on career options; give them work placements and mentoring; and enable them to experience enterprise and trade.

Delivery of these activities should be integral to the curriculum but there are opportunity costs in providing learners with these experiences, as they are in addition to, and not an integral part of, statutory curriculum requirements.

The 2018 CET publication ‘Lost in Transition‘ highlights recommendations for policy makers to enable young adults make a successful transition from education to work and enterprise. It suggests that we need a long-term and co-ordinated approach involving a range of stakeholders to support young people as they enter the labour market.

Examples of Recent Projects and Useful Resources provide information relevant to policy makers.

Commercial Education Trust
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Commercial Education Trust

Lost in Transition

Lost in Transition explores the challenges of preparing young people for work. It concludes that developing skills in young people is one thing but being able to apply and utilise these skills is another. It argues that we have known for some time what skills are.....

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needed for the workplace but that delivery is patchy and a co-ordinated approach is now needed to help young adults make a successful transition from education to work.

Based on case studies which show how design, content, context and teaching methods can be part of a shift from ‘more’ to ‘better’. With recommendations for employers, educators and policy-makers. Lost in Transition is a summary of research conducted in 2017 by Trisha Fettes entitled ‘Putting Skills to Work’.

Education and Employers

Education and Employers

Employer Engagement and Secondary School Attainment Research

This research explores the link between participation in career development activities (careers events such as talks or presentations) and improved education outcomes including exam results. Education and Employers hope to show that through encounters with the world of work young people start seeing value in education, demonstrate positive attitudes towards what they are taught in school and become more motivated in their study.

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The research will involve groups of Year 11 students who will receive extra career development activities on top of their usual provision as well as a control group which continues to receive the usual support which their schools can provide. The findings of this study will be available in early 2019.

Institute of Education, University College London

Institute of Education, University College London

Evaluation of Career Colleges

This project funds an evaluation of Career Colleges scheduled to complete in April 2019. Career Colleges, supported by the Career Colleges Trust, offer a choice in vocational education opportunities for 14-19-year-old young people. The research will investigate their genesis, curriculum, stakeholder perception, employer engagement as well as a monitoring tool to drive improvement.

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The research will also enable the identification of wider policy implications in relation to 14-19 education, early specialisation in a vocational field and other issues relating to further education, employer engagement, commercial education, skills development and social mobility. The research is co-funded with the Edge Foundation.

Trisha Fettes – academic researcher

Trisha Fettes – academic researcher

Putting Skills To Work

There has been a long history of identifying skills needed to perform well in the labour market, but employers have been persistent in voicing concern that those leaving education are not ‘ready’ for work. ‘Putting Skills To Work’ is a study by academic researcher Trisha Fettes which explores practical examples of programmes which incorporate commercial education and how they can improve individuals’ ability to apply the skills, knowledge and know-how they learn in education, as they transition into work.

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The study also explores the feasibility of evaluating such programmes, including tracking participants into the labour market. A summary of this report, Lost in Transition, was produced by CET in 2018 and is available on this website.

Institute of Education, University College London

Institute of Education, University College London

Internship Research

Internship has attracted considerable attention for a number of years and yet until 2011 had rarely been the subject of serious research. In this guide, Prof. David Guile and Ann Lahiff look at the differences between internship, structured work-place learning, and unpaid work experience. They explore how employers offer access to internship and what models of learning are associated with best practice internships. They also offer recommendations for policymakers, companies, stakeholders and for interns/prospective interns.

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Education and Employers

Education and Employers

Teenage Apprenticeships, Converting awareness to recruitment

Recent Government figures have shown that despite the overall number of apprenticeships increasing, the number of under 19s starts have stagnated at around 20%. This project explores the characteristics of schools and individuals who buck the trend and asks: what distinguishes schools which guide significant numbers of pupils into apprenticeships from those which do not? What distinguishes young people who express an interest in apprenticeships in their mid-teens and go on to secure one from those who do not?

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The study concludes that apprenticeships suffer from an image problem due to a shortage of knowledge and information and that support should be provided to schools and colleges to further raise the confidence of school staff in providing advice to interested students. It also advocates for more apprenticeship events involving employers; for schools and colleges should do more to engage parents; and for awareness of apprenticeships to be raised at a younger age. It also notes that schools and colleges should do more to challenge gender stereotypes and broaden the aspirations of young women who are thinking about apprenticeships.

Education and Employers Research

Education and Employers Research

Indicators of successful transitions: Teenage attitudes and experiences related to the world of work

This study harnessed insights from UK longitudinal studies to help careers professionals and other school teaching staff identify and prioritise pupils who require greater levels of careers provision as they approach key decision-making points.

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Importantly, the study identifies attitudes and experiences (‘indicators’) which schools can influence in order to better prepare their young people for adult working life. The approach adopted is primarily designed to allow schools to identify students requiring greater levels of support to help them become well prepared.

A questionnaire and scoring system was developed resulting in a toolkit which has been designed to be comprehensive – relevant to students at all attainment levels – by making use of robust UK longitudinal data which compares students of similar characteristics (for example, socio-economic background, geographical area, attainment levels) to identify which factors which make a difference to economic outcomes (earnings and employment) in later life. It is available from the Education and Employers website.

Education and Employers

Education and Employers

Drawing the Future

Drawing the Future is a survey which asked primary school children aged seven to eleven to draw a picture of the job they want to do when they grew up: over 20,000 entries were received from the UK and internationally. To determine the factors influencing career choices, the survey asked participants whether they personally knew anyone who did the job, and if not, how they knew about the job, as well as their favourite subject.

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The survey findings highlight that children from an early age often have some sophisticated and thought through ideas about who they want to become when they grow up. They also show that from a young age children often stereotype jobs according to gender and their career choices are based on these assumptions with the majority of boys wanting to be sportsmen and girls wanting to be teachers. Additionally, children’s career aspirations are most influenced by who they know – their parents and friends of parents and the TV and media. Worryingly, less than 1% of children have heard about the jobs through people from the world of work coming to their school. And the survey shows clearly for the first time that this is a global issue.

Institute of Education, University College London

Institute of Education, University College London

Putting Knowledge to Work

Putting Knowledge to Work challenges conventional notions of academic knowledge as context-free and it demonstrates that there are complex processes of ‘re-contextualising’ knowledge through the design and implementation of work-based learning at higher education levels.

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This two-year project by Karen Evans, David Guile and Judy Harris and its accompanying Book of Exemplars have been produced to encourage curriculum development teams to draw upon the research and think through, carefully and in depth, the purposes and processes involved in work-based learning.

Educators

Educators

Education providers are key to developing a culture that values skills and business knowledge, as well as academic learning. They are gatekeepers to ensuring…... Read more

Employers

Employers

Employers play a key role in bringing the workplace into the classroom and in helping young people form positive attitudes towards schooling, further and…... Read more

Partners